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Hip

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A hip labral tear is a tearing of the soft tissue (cartilage) that encircles the hip joint and helps to hold the head of the femur (upper leg bone) into the hip socket.

Most prevalent in hockey, football, soccer, ballet and golf athletes, labral tears occur for a variety of reasons, including trauma, repetitive motions (especially rapid pivoting or twisting) or congenital and degenerative structural abnormalities of the hip.

Often a hip labral tear may appear with no signs or symptoms. However, it may be associated with pain, stiffness, limited range of motion and a locking, clicking or catching sensation in the hip.


Groin strain is an abnormal stretching or tearing of the muscles on the inside of the thigh (the gracilis, pectineus, adductor brevis, adductor longus and adductor magnus) that close the legs (adduction).

It is most often felt as a sudden twinge or tearing sensation in the muscle that results in stiffness, pain, weakness with possible swelling and/or bruising of the tissue.

Groin strains occur frequntly in sports as a result of running, jumping or twisting with external rotation of the hip.


A hip flexor strain is an abnormal stretching or tearing of the muscles on the front of the hip (the iliacus and psoas) that lift the knee and bend the trunk and hip.

It is most often felt as a sudden twinge or tearing sensation in the front of the upper thigh and extending up to the waist.

Hip flexor strains results in pain, weakness and stiffness in the joint with movement.


Bursitis is an inflammation of any of the many fluid filed sacs that helps to lubricate the muscles of the lateral hip as they slide over the thigh bone (femur).

Bursitis most often occurs where the gluteus medius muscle or iliotibial band cross over the greater trochanter of the femur.

It commonly produces point tenderness and pain in the lateral hip that often radiates down to the knee causing a limp.